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History at George School

More than “Who?, What?, and When?,” George School history dives deep into “How? and Why?” Take AP Human Geography, for example (and every ninth grader does take it). With a focus on “the why of where,” it is a fascinating introduction to the program, looking at how things are, through the lens of how they were and came to be.

In class you will explore issues that transcend national barriers, such as the causes and consequences of poverty, racism, intolerance, and conflict. The emphasis is on building strong reading, interpretive, analytical, and research skills as well as empathy, because at its core, George School history goes beyond cultivating answerers. It develops the questioners who become discerning global citizens.

History Department Courses

Human Geography/AP Human Geography

This is a 3- to 4-credit course depending on the number of mods taken. Students who take the optional fourth mod of the course are enrolled in AP Human Geography (HIS-118A) and are required to take the exam in May of the year when they take the AP Human Geography mod. Students may take this fourth mod in 9th or 10th grade after successfully completing the first three mods of Human Geography (HIS-110A) in 9th grade.

This course introduces students to human geography. The content is presented thematically and is organized around the discipline’s main subfields: population change, agriculture, economics, political processes, culture, urban land use, and development. The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals serve as the main thread that links these themes together. Students will develop skills in approaching problems geographically, using maps and geospatial technologies, and thinking critically about texts and graphic presentations of data through case studies drawn from all world regions. Students in this course see geography as a discipline relevant to the world in which they live; a source of ideas for identifying, clarifying, and solving problems at various scales and building global citizenship and environmental stewardship.

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 9

US History

In this chronological survey of the history of the United States, topics covered include the political, economic, geographic, and social realities of the nation’s past. The class moves at a swift pace, deepening the students’ capacity to interpret and analyze reading material of both primary and secondary sources. The first mod covers the Foundations of Modern America, the second mod covers the American Century, and the third mod allows students to choose a focus topic dedicated to in-depth research: Civics, Culture, Identity, or International Relations. In lieu of one of these 3 focus mods, students can complete the US History requirement by taking all 3 mods of either African-American History or Intersectional Women’s History.

Students who have completed at least one year at George School may take George School’s online version of this course during the summer.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-3.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Further Topics in US History

Students who would like to explore more than one of the focus areas (Civics, Culture, Identity, and International Relations) from US History [HIS220A] may do so by registering for this course and choosing the mods in which they are interested. The number of credits is determined by the number of mods chosen.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-4.0

Prerequisite: US History (at least 2 credits) or AP US History

Open to: 10, 11, 12

AP US History

This course prepares students for the AP examination in U.S. History. It is a college-level introduction to the development of the United States institutions and society from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change. The reading load is heavy and there are frequent writing assignments.

Students who enroll in this course must sit for the AP exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

AP US Government & Politics

This course is designed to empower students to be active, informed, and engaged citizens with an in-depth knowledge of the American government and political system. Through rigorous project-based and experiential learning, students in this course are exposed to a multitude of concepts relating to political science, governmental institutions, and the essential role that citizens play in the country. Topics include the foundations of American democracy, civil rights and liberties, the interactions between the branches of government, the role of mass media and public opinion, political participation, and the influence of various stakeholders on the policymaking process. In this course, students develop their critical thinking, analytical and evaluative abilities, as well as other key 21st century skills such as public speaking, advocacy, research, and media literacy. An applied civics project is a substantial requirement of this course.

Students who enroll in this course must sit for the AP exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

AP World History: Modern

Students in this fast-paced course learn to view history thematically. The course is organized around five overarching themes that serve as unifying threads throughout the course, helping students to relate what is particular about each time period or society to a “big picture” of history. The themes also provide a way to organize comparisons and analyze change and continuity over time. Independent use of a college-level textbook is necessary, along with reading primary source materials and analyzing them in writing.

A summer assignment is required in preparation for this course. Students who enroll in this course must sit for the AP exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Topics in Global Politics

The first mod of this course, Power, Peace, and Well-Being, focuses on several queries: (1) What is necessary to affect change? (2) What does it mean to live in a peaceful society? (3) What strategies can we use to achieve more peace and well-being in this world? Students use realism, liberalism, and critical theory to examine different types of power, resources needed to acquire power, and examples of how individuals, organizations, and states affect change. Students also learn the difference between positive and negative peace, as well as the concept of structural violence, and use an understanding of these frameworks to identify a spectrum of conflicts in society that hinder well-being. Finally, students begin exploring development initiatives used to address conflict, improve living conditions, and strive towards peace. Students engage in reflective political action related to course content.

Sovereignty, International Organizations, and Human Rights examines the notion of statehood and sovereignty as the primary framework for action in global politics. The course also examines the influence of international organizations, including the UN, IGOs, and NGOS, as well as how these structures improve global cooperation and justice, as well as their limits of doing so. The course focuses on several queries: (1) Who are the most powerful actors in global politics? (2) Do global organizations improve collaboration and justice? (3) How can we best achieve the protection of human rights and individuals in society? Students in this course use realism, liberalism, and critical theory to examine the notion of statehood and to compare the power of states in the global system to the influence of multinational corporations, NGOs, and non-state actors. Students also develop an understanding of the history of human rights, as well as our mechanisms to monitor and enforce human rights, and the obstacles of doing so. Each student taking this mod writes a research paper on human rights.

Students may register for either or both mods of this course. These mods are a subset of the IB SL Global Politics course [HIS437Y], so students wishing to take an IB exam in Global Politics should register for that course rather than this one.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-2.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 11, 12

IB SL Global Politics

This course explores global politics through four core units: power and sovereignity, human rights, peace and conflict, and development and sustainability. It allows students to develop an understanding of political activity and processes, as well as explore political issues affecting their own lives. The course focuses on political theory, while helping students to understand abstract political concepts by grounding them in real-world examples of events and case studies from the past decade, such as the Palestinian bid for Statehood, North Korea’s authoritarian state, the civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Arab Spring. It also invites comparison between such examples and case studies to ensure a wider and trans-national perspective. Students also explore politics through a unique “engagement activity,” which requires them to combine academic research with political action to explore a political topic of their own interest. In this way, students are encouraged to explore the relationship between people and power, and how this manifests on local, national, and international levels.

Students are required to take the IB SL Global Politics examination in May. Students interested in the topics, but not interested in taking the IB exam may take either or both of the first two mods of this course by registering for 1 or 2 credits of Global Politics [HIS436H]

A summer assignment is required for this course and students must sit for the IB exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 11, 12

Topics in Modern History

This course consists of three mods that can be taken independently or together. Students wishing to take more than one mod may take them in any order and they may span multiple years.

Independence Movements
This course explores struggles for independence in India, Africa, and Latin America. Students will examine the complexity of issues and debates surrounding decolonization and the ways different people have sought to transcend legacies of colonialism. To demonstrate their understanding and share their knowledge with others, this course culminates in the creation of a museum exhibit on one country’s movement toward independence.

Rights and Protest: A Comparative Study of South African Apartheid and the US Civil Rights Movement
This course examines and compares the South African Apartheid from 1948-1964 and the United States’ Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965. Students read primary source documents and analyze the causes, events, and people who fought for and against these movements. To explore the situations further, students also undertake a historical investigation on a topic of their choosing

Making the Modern World: Industrialization from 1750-2005
This course delves into the history of technology as examine the history of industrialization focusing primarily on the US, UK, China, and India. We look at the ways the development of mechanization and standardization changed people’s lives and global power dynamics. From the growth of cities to the development of mass communication, from weapons to fast food, this course allows student to examine how technology has created the modern world.

Students may register for any or all mods of this course. These mods are a subset of the IB SL History course [HIS447Y], so students wishing to take an IB SL exam in History should register for that course rather than this one.

(This course will not be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 11, 12

IB SL History

This course, which consists of all three mods of Topics in Modern History (HIS446H) prepares students for the standard-level IB History exam. A major historical investigation project involving intensive research and mature writing is an IB requirement undertaken in the Rights and Protest mod.

Students who enroll in this course must sit for the IB exam.

(This course will not be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 11, 12

IB HL History

This course, in combination with a U. S. History course taken in eleventh grade, prepares students for the higher-level IB History exam with the History of the Americas regional option. Students study selected topics that embrace key events, personalities, and issues of the world in the twentieth-century, with an emphasis on key elements of Canadian and Cuban history. Topics typically included are the emergence of the Americas in global affairs, the First World War with a focus on the role of Canada and the United States, the Great Depression and the Americas, Hitler’s Germany, the move to global war, the Second World War and the Americas, the Chinese Civil War, Castro’s Cuba, and the Contra War. A major historical investigation project involving intensive research and mature writing is an IB requirement undertaken in the first two terms. The course proceeds at a fast pace and regular student participation is expected in the seminar-style classroom format. Substantial reading is regularly assigned from college-level texts.

A summer assignment is required for this course and students must sit for the IB exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (AP US History is preferred)

Open to: 11, 12

Introduction to Economics

This course introduces students to the frameworks through which economists study the world. Using a series of simulations, students will explore concepts including scarcity, opportunity cost, supply and demand, elasticity, the theory of consumer choice, and contemporary economic issues.

This course can either be taken alone or it can serve as the first mod in the AP Microeconomics, AP Macroeconomics, or IB HL Economics sequences.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

IB HL Economics

Economics is an exciting, dynamic subject that allows students to develop an understanding of the complexities and interdependence of economic activities in a rapidly changing world. This course uses economic theories to examine the ways in which these choices are made at the local level, the national level and the global level. While economics has its foundations in theory, the course also emphasizes the application of economic theory to real-world issues. Students develop the analytical tools necessary to acquire a deeper understanding of major global challenges dealing with issues of equity, sustainability, the concentration of economic power and increasing interdependence. Assessments include written IB style tests, research projects, newscasts, simulations, and commentaries on news articles.

The mods must be taken in order but can span multiple years. Students who enroll in this course must sit for the IB exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 5.0-5.0

Prerequisite: Introduction to Economics

Open to: 11, 12

AP Microeconomics

Students in this course prepare for the AP Microeconomics exam and build on the knowledge developed in Introduction to Economics by looking at the formulas that underlie the concepts. Specific economic concepts covered include the nature and functions of product markets, supply and demand, theory of consumer choice, production and costs, firm behavior and market structure, factor markets, market failure, and the role of government.

Students who enroll in this course must sit for the AP exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: Introduction to Economics

Open to: 11, 12

AP Macroeconomics

Students in this course prepare for the AP Macroeconomics exam while at the same time discussing contemporary economic issues. This course will build on the knowledge students develop in Introduction to Economics by looking at how those concepts play out in the world economy. Specific economic concepts covered include international trade, the role of government, measurements of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial sector, stabilization policies, and economic growth.

Students who enroll in this course must sit for the AP exam.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: Introduction to Economics (HIS450A)

Open to: 11, 12

Introduction to Psychology

This course provides an overview of the nature of psychological questions and various approaches to research. The course focuses on understanding psychology through the study of social dynamics, personality, and motivation. Students engage in simulations and demonstrations to see how psychology applies to daily life.

This course is the first in a sequence of 3 or 4 courses that can be combined as either Psychology or AP Psychology, respectively.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Psychology and AP Psychology

Psychology
This course is a 2-3 credit course depending on the number of mods taken. This course would include Introduction to Psychology and 1-2 other mod courses. Please see descriptions of individual mod courses below.

AP Psychology
This course is a 4 credit course that would include all four of the courses listed below. These courses can be taken over multiple school years if desired. Those who are taking AP Psychology should plan to take Developmental and Abnormal Psychology as the last course in the sequence as it will be offered typically during Mod 5 or Mod 6.

Introduction to Psychology
Students will get an overview of the nature of psychological questions and various approaches to research. The course will focus on understanding psychology through the study of social dynamics, personality, and motivation. Students will engage in simulations and demonstrations to see how psychology applies to daily life.
This course is the first in a sequence of 3 or 4 courses that can be combined as either Psychology or AP Psychology, respectively. This course mod is open to 10th graders while the rest of the course mods below are open only to students in grades 11 and 12.

Biological Bases of Behavior
This course will focus on the role of biological functioning in behavior. Students will get an introduction to basic concepts in neuroscience, consciousness, sensation and perception. Students will engage in activities to understand basics of the brain, effects of psychoactive drugs, and how auditory and visual illusions occur.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology

Cognition, Learning and Emotion
This course will examine the processes of thinking, memory, language, learning and emotion as determinants of our behavior. Through these topics students will be able to explain the different ways we learn, evaluate the biases present in our thinking, and debate the definition of intelligence.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology

Developmental and Abnormal Psychology
This course will focus on how we change from childhood through adulthood as well as the causes, symptoms, and therapies for various mental disorders. projects. Students will assess how we define normal in various contexts and practice using their knowledge in real case studies.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-4.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 11, 12

IB SL Psychology

This course focuses on understanding the scientific process and methodology behind psychological concepts.  Students explore biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches to psychology.  Students conduct their own psychological research through the internal assessment which includes development of a testable hypothesis, procedure, statistical analysis, and evaluation. The final unit applies the previous approaches to the study of abnormal behavior.  This course is writing intensive and focuses on critically analyzing scientific studies in the field of psychology.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 11, 12

African American History

In this course, students explore the history of Africans in the Americas by engaging with the work of archivists and historians. Content covers fifteenth-century diplomacy between Africa and Europe; centers African American art, film, and music; and explores twentieth-century debates between Black intellectuals. This course extends the student’s ability to analyze and interpret both primary and secondary sources. Class activities include collaborative group work, oral presentations, debates, lectures, and analysis of historical documents. Successful completion of an independent research project is a course requirement.

Students may take the first mod as a stand-alone course.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Asian-American Experience: East Asia Focus

Asian Americans have been an integral part of ensuring that the United States lives up to its stated values since they first arrived in this country in the 1850s. This course serves as an introduction to several aspects of the Asian American experience including laws, Supreme Court cases, war, and the “model minority” myth. Our topics will include the Chinese Exclusion Act, the American occupation of Hawaii and the Philippines, Japanese Internment, the impact of wars on Asian Americans, and the legal construction of whiteness designed to explicitly exclude Asians. While Asian Americans are a group comprising myriad nationalities and cultures, this one mod course will focus on Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, and Vietnamese Americans.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

History of Architecture & Urban Design

This course uncovers at the ways that built environment has both responded to and been shaped by U.S. society. Students explore the history of architecture and urban planning from the late-nineteenth century to the present, examining the impact of the architecture on society, politics, economics, and the environment. Students develop a working knowledge of the major design movements of the last 150 years and the current issues and trends in architecture and urban planning. The goal of this course is for students to develop the skills to understand and analyze the built environment–from houses and everyday streetscapes to skyscrapers and experimental designs–and to understand how these spaces are products of the society in which they were created. We also analyze how the built environment has perpetuated inequalities and explore the contemporary movements to address these issues. Taking advantage of our location, the class regularly ventures off campus to survey buildings and communities in the area.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: the second mod of any US History course

Open to: 10, 11, 12

History of Communism

This course is comprised of three mods that can be taken independently. It is recommended that the mods be taken in sequential order; they can be taken over multiple years.

In the Origins of Communism mod, students examine the origins of communism, beginning with the earliest phases of the “Utopian Socialist” movement. The course then moves through the expansion of communism during the years of the Cold War, particularly in Asia and Cuba. The focus of assessment in this class is on honing history skills of causation, comparison, and continuity and change over time through essay writing.

The Communism in Crisis mod class focuses on challenges for communist states during the years 1976-1989. Topics iinclude the struggle for power following the death of Mao Zedong, China under Deng Xiaoping, domestic and foreign problems of the Brezhnev era, Gorbachev and his aims/policies, and the consequences of Gorbachev’s policies for Eastern Europe. The focus of assessment in this class is on document evaluation and analysis.

In the Researching Communism mod, students collaborate with the instructor, librarians, and classmates to produce two substantial research projects: a Project Based Learning Gold Standard presentation and a traditional research paper. It is recommended students take either The Origins of Communism or Communism in Crisis prior to this mod.

(One mod of this course will be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-3.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Intersectional Women’s History

This course serve as an introduction to the concepts of intersectionality, core cultural identifiers, the patriarchy, and the ways in which personhood and bodies have been legislated both in the United States and abroad.

Mod 1 (can be taken separately):
Students use primary and secondary sources, film, and articles from current publications to inform our studies, with lively wide-ranging discussions serving as a hallmark of this course. Topics include indigenous views of gender roles, the impact of anti-colonial revolutions on notions of femininity, violence, maternal mortality, and the interconnectedness of racism and the patriarchy.

Mod 2:

This mod is an expansion and continuation of the concepts established in Mod 1. Topics include feminism and its waves, educational and economic empowerment, specific Constitutional Amendments such as the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th, the Supreme Court, reproductive rights, and LGBTQ+ identity and rights.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-2.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Japanese History and Culture

This project-based course provides an in-depth exploration of the history and culture of Japan. We begin by analyzing the spiritual, cultural, and artistic foundations of early Japan, with specific focus on Shinto, Buddhism, Confucianism, the Samurai, and the Shogunate. The second part of the course examines modernization, imperialism, and militarization from the Meiji Restoration through World War II. We then conclude by exploring the evolution of modern Japan. Specific topics include economic development and globalization, natural disasters and crisis response, environmental concerns and sustainable energy, regional security and nuclear non-proliferation, gender inequality and human rights, and modern Japanese art and culture. The main assessments will be three student-led research projects, encompassing the time periods of each module. In addition, a core component of the course utilizes class discussions to analyze primary sources, film productions, and cultural media.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Latin American History

This course explores the historical, social, cultural, economic, and political factors that have helped shape Latin America. We begin by examining the development and interaction of Indigenous and Spanish civilizations. From this contact a process of transculturation began which led to the formation of a new Latin American culture. After establishing empires throughout Latin America, the European powers set up the latifundia system to extract resources for the benefit of the colonizers and the global economy. We then explore how this economic and social system continues to have substantial impact on Latin America and interactions with Western powers.

The second part of the course examines the independence, evolution, and modernization of different nations in Latin America. At the heart of such analysis is the utilization of case studies regarding Brazil, Cuba, Guatemala, and Puerto Rico. In addition, students each research the history of a particular nation from the 19th-21st century. Current events and geography quizzes are an ongoing focus throughout this part of the course. After completing major research projects on their nation, students conduct a regional summit focused on addressing the goals as stated by the United Nations. Student learn and follow parliamentary procedures and compose position papers leading up to the conference.

(This course will not be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

The Origins of Democracy

This course examines the origins of democracy, specifically in Ancient Greece, with a focus on the period of Solon’s reforms to the end of the Peloponnesian War. The course uses the case study of Athenian democracy to explore themes relevant to contemporary life including: (1) debate and civic discourse as the foundation of democratic political structures, (2) issues of equity in representation and political decision-making, (3) peace, prosperity, and expansion enabled by democratic structures, and (4) the consolidation of power and the relinquishing of representation for the sake of security and stability. Blending history, philosophy, and political science, this course connects ancient history to contemporary political issues, relationships, and conflicts.

(This course will not be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

The United Nations & Leadership

This course introduces students to International Relations through the lens of the United Nations (UN). Students learn about the founding, functions, and programs of the UN. Students also gain an understanding of current global issues through an exploration of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Once students have gained foundational knowledge of the UN, diplomacy, and global issues, they then work to transmit this knowledge as they organize a middle school Model UN (MUN) Conference. They choose the issues, research the issues, and write the issue bulletins. Students also visit nearby schools and teach lessons to middle school students to prepare them for a Junior MUN conference held at George School. This course requires students to gain academic knowledge, organize all the logistics of a conference, create lesson plans to share their knowledge, teach those lesson plans to younger students, and ideally empower younger students to work together to find solutions to world problems.

(This course will not be offered in 2022-23.)

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Entrepreneurship

This course is a business plan competition. Students work on creating and executing a business plan while concurrently learning relevant business theories that they are applying in real time. The course allows for in-depth practice of organizational structure, human resources, production, finance, and marketing. The goal of this course is to give students the opportunity to both be introduced to business theory and to learn by doing and reflecting. Students engage in building a business plan, creating and designing a product of mostly recycled materials, hiring labor, marketing their product, as well as keeping track of all their finances. This interdisciplinary, experiential-based course allows students to understand more about the world in which they live. Assessments in this course include written assessments on theory, critiques of case studies, research, written business plan, execution of business plan and reflection.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 2.0-2.0

Prerequisite: a US History course (may be taken concurrently)

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Social Science of Climate Change

This course explores the problems facing communities around the globe as a result of climate change. Students examine a wide range of solutions from the individual to the global scale, consider the potential impact of solutions, and put their knowledge to work bringing about meaningful change. Throughout, students continually examine their own experiences, communities, and practices to see the role they play in both causing and solving this crisis.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

Producing Peace: Civic Media Literacy & Production

This course is cross-listed as MUL770P (Extradisciplinary) and ARP220P (Arts). See the course description for MUL770P (Extradisciplinary) in the Extradisciplinary section of the catalog.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 3.0-3.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 10, 11, 12

A Brief History of Vietnam

This course is cross-listed as MUL880V (Extradisciplinary). See MUL880V (Extradisciplinary) in the Extradisciplinary section of the catalog for description.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 11, 12

Economics & Sustainability (in the Netherlands)

This course is cross-listed as MUL930N (Extradisciplinary). See MUL930N (Extradisciplinary) in the Extradisciplinary section of the catalog for description.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 11, 12

Transformative Justice

This course is cross-listed as ENG980X (English) and MUL980X (Extradisciplinary). This domestic-travel class requires parental consent. See MUL980X (Extradisciplinary) in the Extradisciplinary section of the catalog for description.

Min-Max Credit Hours: 1.0-1.0

Prerequisite: none

Open to: 11, 12

More to Explore

Exploring Global Politics with the Model United Nations Club

There are so many clubs to join at George School, and every club is happy to have new members stop by their meetings and learn what their unique group is all about. I was introduced to Model UN at the George School Club Fair in the fall of my freshman year and now I am glad to share everything I have learned with new members.

A Tribute to Pentagon Papers Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg

Daniel Ellsberg is a national treasure and he has tremendous energy and generosity of spirit. This is the third event that Dan has done with me at George School. As a teacher, I can’t imagine a better way for students to learn about these subjects.

Understanding That Other People Can Be Right

Modeling respectful dialogue in our IB HL History classroom with Fran Bradley about Fidel Castro's Cuba has not only helped my students but has helped me to understand that other people can be right.